There are a lot of common nutrition myths that are widely believed, but simply not true. I want to debunk these myths! In this post, I go over some of these myths and debunk the common perception. Check out the video or read the blog to learn more.

Nutrition Myth #1: Eating after 7pm will cause an increase in weight gain

This nutrition myth portrays itself as an issue due to your body’s metabolism slowing down at night. In reality, you can eat later than 7pm. The important note is to not over eat or indulge high calorie snacks (ice cream, cookies) due to unnecessary excess in calories which seems to happen later at night with casual snacking versus during the day. 

Nutrition Myth #2: Frozen fruits and veggies aren’t has healthy as fresh fruits and veggies.

While freezing fruits or vegetables, there will be certain nutrients effected in a negative way. In comparison while cooking fresh fruits or vegetables there will also be a loss in nutrients. Therefore, looking at the big picture, the loss of nutrients in either form is no where near the overall loss of nutrients when not including fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.

Nutrition Myth #3: Salt should be eliminated from your diet

Salt is actually an important element when it comes to your body’s overall function. While digesting an appropriate amount of salt, you will assist in hydration and nerve function. Too much salt however can cause issues with fluid retention and cause complications.  The recommended daily sodium intake is to be less than 2,300 mg or roughly one teaspoon of salt per day.

Nutrition Myth #4: Eating a lot of protein is the only way to gain muscle

Eating a lot of protein will build muscle. Eating protein will unfortunately not build any muscle, in fact the only way to build muscle to to physically exercises. Physical exercise, whether it be distance running or weight lifting, is crutial to building muscle. By adding protein to your diet in conjunction you will benefit but it’s equally important and beneficial to consume grains, fruits and veggies!

Nutrition Myth #5: Skinny = Healthy

It’s unfortunate that this has to be debunked but due to social media, celebrities, etc, this has been a staple for confusion. Weight is not a good indicator of being healthy, especially when it comes to utilizing the BMI index. Someone who fits perfectly in their BMI index may be unhealthy to where someone who is higher in their index may be very fit and healthy. The primary focus should not be on your body weight or what size clothing you wear, rather how fit you can be!


In closing, I want to thank you again for taking the time to either watch the video or read the blog for National Nutrition Month! The information discussed and provided is strictly to assist in understanding facts vs myths in regards to nutrition. If you have any questions leave them in the comments and we will get back to you as soon as possible

Devin McLaughlin, PTA


SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel

LIKE us on Facebook for more content: https://www.facebook.com/robbinsrehab…

FOLLOW us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/robbinsreha…

Click Here to schedule your FREE Physical Therapy Evaluation Today